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Waste Management and Waste Infrastructure Market in GCC countries
The GCC countries rank among the highest waste generating countries per capita in the world. Estimates of the total amount of waste generated in the GCC range from 90 million to 150 million metric tons annually.

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Water & Waste Water Infrastructure Challenges in GCC Countries
The challenge of keeping pace with rapid population growth in the Gulf region is creating constant bottlenecks, especially in the infrastructure and wastewater management sectors. Member countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) are addressing the challenge with massive development plans projecting steady population and economic growth until 2030.

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Polish municipal delegation studies circular waste management on Norway visit
Against the background of the EU's ambitious waste management targets, Norwegian and Polish stakeholders met on Wednesday 14 September in Drammen.

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Future of waste management tops the agenda in Poland
At several recent high-level gatherings, Green Business Norway had the opportunity to share experiences and talk strategy with Polish decision makers.

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Great interest in green technology at BI program launch in Abu Dhabi
Representatives of Nordic embassies and companies joined their local partners from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) at Masdar City in Abu Dhabi on 21 January to launch the green business intelligence program for the region.

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Nordic green partnership launches in Abu Dhabi, UAE
As Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week gets under way, Green Business Norway (GBN), Green Net Finland and Nordic Innovation are launching the next phase of their business intelligence program for the Gulf region.

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Bulgarian delegation in Norway to study sustainable waste to energy
In October 2015, Green Business Norway played host to an official delegation from Bulgaria, showing the visitors three sustainable, future-oriented waste to energy options.

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Telemark–Lubelskie partnership centres on green business
A delegation from the Lubelskie region visited Telemark last week. After a tour of the county, Sławomir Sosnowski, governor of the Lubelskie region, and Terje Riis-Johansen, convener of Telemark county council, signed a wide-ranging cooperation agreement between the two regions.

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Norwegian prime minister meets Green Business Norway
On Tuesday 18 August, Norwegian prime minister Erna Solberg visited Klosterøya in Skien, a hub of knowledge-based businesses, including the head office of Green Business Norway. Over lunch with the prime minister, local business representatives proudly promoted the diverse and innovative economy of the Grenland region.

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Norwegian cleantech shows the way at EcoForum in Poland
The sixth EcoForum conference took place on 10 and 11 June this year. Once again, the conference proved to be a productive forum for both countries’ participants in the inter-regional cooperation program between Telemark in Norway and Lubelskie in Poland.

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Gulf region a land of promise for recycling and green energy
With several recycling demonstration projects under way in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the outlook for business development in the region is promising, according to Green Business Norway (GBN).

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Grand launch
of Romania's TOMRA-based recycling system

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Renewable energy from bales of straw
Last week, regional government representatives from Lubelskie in Poland and Telemark in Norway met in England for a closer look at the Sleaford Renewable Energy Plant.

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The Polish parliament targets best practice in sustainable waste management
A Polish-Norwegian initiative recently brought over 100 people together at the Sejm, the lower house of the Polish parliament, for a seminar to discuss the latest trends in waste management.

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Poland and Norway discuss the future of waste management
The fast-changing waste management sector is facing some key strategic decisions regarding its future direction. In recent years, Green Business Norway has actively promoted the exchange of best practice between Poland and Norway.

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Waste to energy - environmentally friendly AND profitable?
That was the question asked of panellists at one of the many panel discussions during this year's Energy Forum, which took place in Karpacz, Poland.

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GBN was one of the hosts when His Royal Highness The Crown Prince visited Klosterøya Business Park in Skien
The position of the Norwegian Cleantech industry now and in a five-year perspective was among the topics discussed with His Royal Highness.

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Ennox Oil: Cleantech breakthrough
Ennox Oil Solutions is a good example of a new business opportunity resulting from the intersection of two very different sectors of the economy. In this case, some innovators offering industrial waste treatment solutions encountered some fellow innovators offering solutions for oil well stimulation.

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Member Spotlight: TergoPower aims for key role in modernizing Poland’s energy system
The goal is to build a viable company with growth potential based on sustainable utilization of biomass as an energy source. Since its establishment in 2009, TergoPower has focused on the
Polish market and has succeeded in positioning itself as an
important partner for regional authorities.

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Miljøbil Grenland: A midget flexes its muscles
Miljøbil Grenland made no secret of its change of direction during the first quarter of 2011. Bernt Ausland, the company’s CEO, clasps his hands and pretends he is shaking dice: “New deal.”

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Norner tightens grip on growth
Having made steady progress and with its original ambition well established, Norner – the privately owned research institute – is set to continue its exciting course.
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Norner tightens grip on growth ambitions

Having made steady progress and with its original ambition well established, Norner – the privately owned research institute – is set to continue its exciting course. Some of the development initiatives being taken now are among the most exciting and pioneering since the company was spun off from Borealis four years ago.

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CEO Tine Rørvik and Market Manager Ole Jan Myhre of Norner AS. (Photo by Tom Riis)

Plastics from CO2

The company’s technological development projects are often carried out in collaboration with partners facing specific challenges in their production. However, pure research projects also form a key part of activities, often involving partners such as Innovation Norway or the Research Council of Norway. One important example of this type of activity is the project in which Norner is developing technology to extract plastics from CO2.

“The project has two primary areas of focus,” explains Market Manager Ole Jan Myhre. “Firstly, it’s about developing more effective production technology for raw materials for plastics from CO2. Our ambition is to establish a pilot plant for this production here in the Grenland region. Secondly, the project is also concerned with developing specific plastic materials that can be used in conventional end products.”

Does this mean Norner will now also consider moving into manufacture of end products?


“Getting more involved in this area is certainly on the cards, among other things through the establishment of our subsidiary Norner Verdandi. But the pilot plant we’re prioritising now will focus first and foremost on providing the means for us to continue our studies in production technologies for large-scale production.”


How far in the future do you think establishment of a pilot plant will be?

“Technically speaking, it would be realistic within a period of three to five years, but it’s an ambitious project and a big investment for us. By way of comparison, our largest and most ambitious research projects at the moment involve between five and ten people.

“Norner currently has five main segments. In terms of oil and gas, we have a particularly large number of projects within plastic materials for the Offshore industry. Within Packaging, our most important projects are linked to improved distribution of foods by means of packaging development and testing for the industry. Where foodstuffs are concerned, we have played a key role in defining new methods that make it possible for foods to reach the end consumer fresh and in one piece, while simultaneously making the use of packaging as practical and cost-effective as possible. We are also important suppliers to the Pipe, Petrochemical and Automotive industries.”

International breakthroughs

Norner has made significant international breakthroughs in the Petrochemical and Chemical industries. The company is experiencing sound growth in its international client base, and an ever-increasing number of research assignments are coming from clients outside Norway, with growth particularly high in Asia.

Based on the company’s extremely positive development in Asia, it made sense for management to assess how to better organise the structure for continued international growth. From the original situation after the spin-off, when the ambition was simply to survive, the company’s 60 dedicated employees have managed to build up a new position where it is realistic to think seriously about positioning, internationalisation, growth and brand building.

Offshoots

In recent months this positive development has resulted in two offshoots from the company: Norner Verdandi and Norner Mimir. Norner Verdandi’s main function is to identify, assume ownership of and development profitable companies based on technology and knowledge in Norner or from other companies. Norner Mimir India has been established to strengthen Norner's market position and customer follow-up in Asia.

What do these changes say about the company’s strategy?
“What it means is that we’ve now taken on board that we’re in the process of becoming an established name beyond Norway within our specialist areas. The target for the next five years will be to consolidate growth and, even with the obvious challenges that uncertainty in international markets entails, so far we are well on budget.”

The course has been set for further international growth, while the Norner brand will retain its solid Norwegian foundation. So as the Nornes – the goddesses of fate in old Norse mythology – continue to spin their web of destiny, the future remains bright for the company that has borrowed their name.



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